Wild Kombucha SCOBY Explained

The process of making each bottle of Wild Kombucha begins with a SCOBY.

SCOBY stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast. “Symbiotic” refers to strains of bacteria and yeast living in a complex yet harmonious community, supporting and depending on each other. [1]

SCOBY may look strange as it is typically round, dense and rubbery with a vinegar-like smell but these are all good signs that it’s aiding the kombucha to ferment the way it should be.

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Scoby 2

SCOBY stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast. “Symbiotic” refers to strains of bacteria and yeast living in a complex yet harmonious community, supporting and depending on each other. [1]

SCOBY may look strange as it is typically round, dense and rubbery with a vinegar-like smell but these are all good signs that it’s aiding the kombucha to ferment the way it should be.

How Does SCOBY Help Create Kombuchas?

SCOBY is a living culture that requires food and the right environment to thrive. Wild Kombuchas are produced by adding SCOBY with sweetened black tea and here begins a complex biological process.

In simpler terms, we leave them to ferment for up to three weeks. The bacteria and yeast in the SCOBY then breaks down the tea’s sugar and converts them to organic acids, carbon dioxide, traces of alcohol and B vitamins. [2]

The fermentation process also increases the concentration of probiotics – a type of beneficial bacteria found in the gut known to bring many positive health benefits. [2]

This entire process results in the creation of a fizzy product with a sweet, tangy and vinegar-like taste, known as kombucha. As for specific flavours, it depends on the addition of other ingredients like fruits, botanical, spices and herbs.

In case you’re wondering, we only fuel our SCOBY with black tea leaves and organic cane sugar. This is because we are committed to nourishing the community with the healthiest and tastiest kombucha, one sip at a time.

Sources:

[1] Ai Leng Teoha,, Gillian Heard, Julian Cox.(2044). Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 95(2), 119-126. doi:10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2003.12.020

[2] Healthline.com, Kombucha SCOBY: What It Is and How to Make One

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